How today’s architects and designers are creating offices in the great outdoors

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How today’s architects and designers are creating offices in the great outdoors
In this park in London, individuals or groups can book space in the TreeXOffice.

Inside a treehouse in a London park, important work is being done. Erected for the London Festival of Architecture, TreeXOffice is a co-working space available for bookings through December, rent payable to the tree at its centre. You read that correctly: the deep-rooted landlord collects tenant fees and pours the money into maintaining its park, Hoxton Square, and surrounding green spaces in the borough of Hackney.

Australian-American artist Natalie Jeremijenko created the project in collaboration with artists Shuster + Moseley and architecture firm Tate Harmer. The temporary structure, commissioned by Artsadmin and Groundwork London, has a frame made of compressed paper and timber, kitted out with transparent plastic louvres that can be lifted open to let in the full glory of the sun’s rays, or pulled down to diffuse glare. Individuals or groups can book space – for £15 or £120 ($29.50 or $235) for a half-day Monday to Friday, respectively; local community groups have free rein on weekends – at the wraparound desks, with access to a power supply and WiFi.

It’s playful, literally a treehugger solution to a real problem: How to monetize the true value of nature. And as a beautiful piece of micro-architecture, it also encourages us to think outside of the box in creating offices out of doors. []

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