Architectural origins of St. Louis can still be seen, but you’ll have to look closely

0
The architectural origins of St. Louis
The Church of the Holy Family in Cahokia was built in 1799, replacing a similar structure built 100 years before

Disclaimer | This article may contain affiliate links, this means that at no cost to you, we may receive a small commission for qualifying purchases.

Architectural origins of St. Louis can still be seen, but you'll have to look closely
The Church of the Holy Family in Cahokia was built in 1799, replacing a similar structure built 100 years before.

Early on, the buildings often were of the basic poteaux-sur-sol and poteaux-sur-terre construction, buildings framed by logs set perpendicular to the ground, with the timbers resting on sills and or sunk into the earth and bonded by a mortar called pierrotage, a mixture of clay or lime and stones.

This region boasts the apotheosis of this style. It is the late 18th-century Church of the Holy Family in the village of Cahokia, mere minutes from downtown St. Louis. Other examples are found south of St. Louis in Missouri and Illinois in relative abundance.

Ste. Genevieve is a good place to stop if you go on a French colonial pilgrimage. There one finds a National Landmark, the Louis Bolduc house, now a museum.

Later, as immigration became more diverse, houses with any number of European relationships were established – Weil featured a house of Alsatian inspiration. A barn in South St. Louis has characteristics of half-timbered, or Fachwerk, traditions that evolved in Europe. […]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here