Does New York need a second High Line?

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Does New York need a second High Line?

Does New York need a second High Line?

Perkins Eastman is taking two of the best-loved urban land-use stories of the Bloomberg era—the High Line and Times Square—and combining them into one.

Two of the better achievements during Michael Bloomberg’s time as mayor of New York involved new ways of thinking about using urban land. The High Line, whose construction began in 2006, and Times Square, which was closed to traffic in 2009, serve as models that have been widely adopted across the country.

One architecture firm wants to combine the two concepts for New York City.

Perkins Eastman has released a plan to turn Broadway Avenue into a pedestrian park running 40 blocks up and down Manhattan. The Green Line would extend from Columbus Circle to Union Square, connecting several prominent parks and plazas (Madison Square, Herald Square, Times Square) along the way.

Jonathan Cohn, a principal for Perkins Eastman, spoke to Dezeen about the proposal. “As a linear at-grade park, the Green Line would provide much needed active and passive recreational space in the heart of the city,” Cohn said—speaking in terms that will be familiar to anyone who’s visited Times Square or the High Line in the last decade.

The Green Line extends the logic of changes that have already taken root along the limited stretch of Broadway running through Times Square. Perkins Eastman’s proposal builds on the work of Jan Gehl and Snøhetta, the architects who pedestrianized Times Square. Yet it also echoes the High Line by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The Green Line project commandeers a piece of infrastructure—in this case, Broadway, which is still very much in use by drivers—and converts it into parkland and pedestrian and cycle paths. […]

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