High Bridge Reopens the Bronx to Pedestrian Power

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High Bridge Reopens the Bronx to Pedestrian Power
A view of the reopened High Bridge, facing Manhattan from the Bronx.

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High Bridge Reopens the Bronx to Pedestrian Power
A view of the reopened High Bridge, facing Manhattan from the Bronx.

In theory, a bridge exists to link places that need connecting, but for six decades, the High Bridge connected nothing at all. It leapt between two steep, weedy escarpments on either side of the Harlem River, over highways and ramps and railways. Until Tuesday, it might have saved itself even that trouble. The bridge spent the last 45 years derelict and padlocked, an abandoned bit of 19th-century glory that was of no use to anyone — certainly not to the residents of the Bronx neighborhood called Highbridge. Now, after a $61 million renovation, the bridge has reopened to pedestrians and bikers, and though it may take a while for the Sims on either side to discover a new byway and start flowing across, eventually the psychological map of New York will make a small but important adjustment. Suddenly, people have a new direction in which to walk, and a new reason to do so.

Built in 1848 to carry fresh water across river water on its way to the Croton Reservoir at 42nd Street, the High Bridge bore pedestrians, too, who came to stroll back and forth between rural upper Manhattan and the even more rural Bronx. Down below, within spitting and tossing range of the bridge, swells raced their carriages along the Harlem Speedway. Edgar Allan Poe is said to have hiked to this spot over the Bronx’s rocky terrain from his cottage on the Kingsbridge Road, where his wife was slowly expiring of tuberculosis.

A lithograph by B.J. Rosenmeyer shows the writer, a year before his own death, trudging through the snow over a wind-whipped viaduct, the cliffs behind him plunging to the river below. To retrace his whole itinerary on foot today would be a demoralizing experience: beneath the elevated No. 6 train and over the Cross Bronx Expressway, past a wilderness of ramps and forests of housing projects. Laced with truck routes, sundered from Manhattan by a wide ravine and traffic-choked bridges, the South Bronx is friendly only to the most committed pedestrians. []

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