Le Corbusier, Remastered: 3D printing in architecture

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Le Corbusier, Remastered: 3D printing in architecture

Le Corbusier, Remastered: 3D printing in architecture

Famed for its geometrically challenging organic form and ability to frustrate architects and model makers decades after its completion, Le Corbusier’s chapel “Notre Dame du Haut”, more commonly known as Ronchamp, has proved incredibly difficult for model makers to accurately replicate.

In fact, it is such a particular and well-known form, that when modelled inaccurately, it is very obvious. After seeing many model makers suffer the same fate as the builders that constructed the original building located on the hill of Bourlémont near Belfort in Eastern France, London based, 3D printing studio, Digits2Widgets (D2W) set itself the challenge of creating the most accurate model of the chapel ever produced, with the aid of 3D printing.

“We do an awful lot of work for architects,” explained Jonathan Rowley, Design Director at D2W and an Architect too. “What we wanted to do was produce an absolutely exquisite architectural model that was 100% 3D printed and would illustrate all of the things that architects should be thinking about if they’re looking to use 3D printing to produce models.”

Some of those key points include understanding the 3D print materials that are most appropriate for the project and then designing a CAD model that provides all of the key detail for the scale you’re producing the model and at a scale the selected 3D printer will be able to reproduce. These are the same modelling design decisions that have always had to be made. The advent of CAD and 3D printing don’t change this. It’s the Architectural backgrounds and experience running industrial 3D printing equipment that enabled D2W to make these judgements, which allowed the printers to do their very best. []

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