Mortal Cities and Forgotten Monuments

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Mortal Cities and Forgotten Monuments
Memorial in Tjentiste, Bosnia-Herzegovina.
Mortal Cities and Forgotten Monuments
Memorial in Tjentiste, Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Former Yugoslavia has always been a breeding ground for conflict. Architecture played a big role at many turning points in the history of this area, both in the decades after the Second World War and during (and after) the Yugoslav War.

The former Yugoslavia has always been a breeding ground for conflict. Due to its geographical location between Western and Eastern Europe, many powers, both before and after the First World War, had an interest in conquering this region, resulting in a mix of different cultures, religions, and heritage. After the Second World War ended, Yugoslavia was in ruins. Josip Broz, better know as Tito, became the leader of the country. To deal with the nationalist tendencies within the region, he introduced a strict socialist regime, which emphasised the similarities and mutual dependency of the different ethnic groups of the six republics within the region. Especially after the Second World War, Yugoslavia became a laboratory for making different ethnicities and religions work within the same nation via education, media, theatre, film and architecture.

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